Centre Write
Centre Write
Starting this September, working parents will be able to claim up to 30 hours worth of ‘free’ childcare. This is estimated to affect 600,000 families to the tune of roughly £5,000 per year. However, despite the Government’s generous giveaway packages, childcare remains one of the biggest expenses for UK households, akin to other topical necessities, like housing.To send a child under the age of two to nursery, just part-time, costs families an average of £6,000 per year; for middle-income earners,…
“I knew I was going to have to work my way up from the bottom, but I couldn’t even get a job at the bottom. I wasn’t expecting to have a dream job land in my lap but at the same time I wasn’t expecting to be turned away from places like McDonalds.” This was the experience of Emalene, one of the young women interviewed in 2015 for the Young Women’s Trust inquiry Scarred for Life, which focused on the…
According to the latest Office for National Statistics figures, over 30% of the UK workforce is aged 50 and above, and there are over 1.1 million over 65 still in employment. As the State Pension age continues to rise, reaching 67 by 2028, more and more people are likely to decide to keep working, meaning this number is only going to increase. The need for government and employers to understand what this means has never been greater. Maximising the skills…
In these enlightened days, nobody apart from the most contrarian of internet trolls, is in favour of discrimination. So how do we explain the gender wage gap – the much-discussed gap between what men and women earn? Do we live in a world of hypocrites? Or are people in positions of power discriminating against women without knowing it? Perhaps the best place to start in unpacking the gender wage gap debate is to acknowledge that pay can be measured in…
When we launched Renewal in the heatwave summer of 2013, our express goal was that the Conservative Party should be seen as the ‘workers’ party’, unapologetically being on the side of working people. And with policy moves like the Northern Powerhouse and the National Living Wage, the Party is going a long way to make that a reality. Now, with Labour’s catastrophic doubling down into the obsessions of Islington and its election of Jeremy Corbyn, Conservatives can take this opportunity…
The 1975 referendum on Britain’s membership of the then European Economic Community has, until recently, been something of a historical footnote - remembered primarily perhaps for Margaret’s Thatcher’s startling choice of flag-branded knitwear when launching the Remain campaign. However, with a re-run of that referendum due in just over three month’s time, this rather dusty corner of modern British history has moved from sartorial marginalia to the political spotlight; campaigners from both sides are seeking insights from their antecedent’s experiences…
The Rt Hon Lord Willetts on tax credits and the future of in-work benefits The Chancellor did the right thing in deciding not to pursue his cuts to tax credits. The scale of the proposed losses for low income working families was just too much for them. That was the pragmatic political argument and it was very persuasive. But it leaves open another and deeper question. What do Conservatives think of tax credits in principle? Do they fit in to…
Tuesday, 15 March 2016 10:54

Nick Hurd MP: Why I’m a Bright Blue MP

Nick Hurd MP on Bright Blue’s role in shaping forward-looking policy The Conservative Party needs to be constantly nudged out of its comfort zone. In a changing world, future success as a political party depends on our ability to think deeply about the big challenges of the era. That is why I think Bright Blue is so important as a goad. Indeed more important than ever. In his latest book, Charles Handy writes about how the most successful organisations, like…
Frances O’Grady on the place of trade unions in the modern world. In my job, I am privileged to meet workers from all over the country. One of the workers whose story has stayed with me is Daisy, who worked in a cinema in south London. Daisy and her colleagues just weren’t paid enough to live on – but by banding together as a union, they were able to get a 23% pay rise. Daisy isn’t the media’s stereotype of…
Wingham Rowan asks if it is time for a full-spectrum employment policy We seem to be witnessing the start of a ‘Great Fragmentation’ in developed economies. Supply and demand across all sorts of sectors is breaking down into smaller units. Householders renting their sofas on occasional nights pushed AirBnB to the world’s fifth biggest hotelier six years after launch. Taskrabbit workers drop everything when booked for a half hour’s courier work that would previously have gone to a company rostering…

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