Centre Write
Centre Write
Tuesday, 15 March 2016 10:54

Nick Hurd MP: Why I’m a Bright Blue MP

Nick Hurd MP on Bright Blue’s role in shaping forward-looking policy The Conservative Party needs to be constantly nudged out of its comfort zone. In a changing world, future success as a political party depends on our ability to think deeply about the big challenges of the era. That is why I think Bright Blue is so important as a goad. Indeed more important than ever. In his latest book, Charles Handy writes about how the most successful organisations, like…
Frances O’Grady on the place of trade unions in the modern world. In my job, I am privileged to meet workers from all over the country. One of the workers whose story has stayed with me is Daisy, who worked in a cinema in south London. Daisy and her colleagues just weren’t paid enough to live on – but by banding together as a union, they were able to get a 23% pay rise. Daisy isn’t the media’s stereotype of…
Wingham Rowan asks if it is time for a full-spectrum employment policy We seem to be witnessing the start of a ‘Great Fragmentation’ in developed economies. Supply and demand across all sorts of sectors is breaking down into smaller units. Householders renting their sofas on occasional nights pushed AirBnB to the world’s fifth biggest hotelier six years after launch. Taskrabbit workers drop everything when booked for a half hour’s courier work that would previously have gone to a company rostering…
For decades, Britain has not built enough houses. Today, housing completions lie well short of the number required to stabilise the market, despite a strong economy. This lack of supply is widely diagnosed, but solutions are trickier. Interestingly, recent research has indicated that an existing government policy, Help to Buy, is having a strong positive effect upon supply. Help to Buy makes up to 20% of the cost of a newly built home available to first time buyers as an…
In 1942, the architect of the welfare state, Sir William Beveridge, characterised the self-employed as “small shopkeepers, crofters, fishermen, hawkers, outworkers”. Suffice to say that times change and with the number of people self-employed burgeoning – up to 4.62 million and 15% of the UK’s workforce – understanding the characteristics of this group vital. Earlier this week, Bright Blue published its report Standing alone? which focuses on self-employed individuals who are in low income households - households with income below…
As the referendum debate rages on, Conservatives can make an argument to remain in the EU based not on fear for the consequences of Brexit, but on a passionate attachment to the principles at the heart of the Union - conservative principles. The tie-up between British conservatism and the dream of a European community of nations was widely recognised for much of the twentieth century. Speaking in 1975 Margaret Thatcher looked back to Disraeli's aspirations for trans-European diplomacy to argue…
Professor Margaret Levi on a familiar story of job creation “All along the shore, come in.” This was the call to the men sleeping rough on the beach and keen for work on the docks. The films On the Waterfront and Cinderella Man capture the indignity of this employment process. This was the 1920s and 1930s, and those who later formed the longshore unions began as casual labour, treated with indifference, disrespect, and greed by their temporary employers. It is…
Benedict Dellot on how government can help those who go it alone Take the wages. People who strike out on their own earn a third less than someone in a typical job. They are also half as likely to contribute to a private pension, and considerably less likely to engage in regular training. This is not to mention the myriad personal pressures: isolation, a lack of affirmation and an abiding sense of precariousness. Why, then, do the ranks of the…
The Rt Hon Sajid Javid MP says that vocational education is the key to social mobility I grew up on Stapleton Road in Bristol, which a tabloid once dubbed “Britain’s most dangerous street” and “a moral cesspit”. Sure, it wasn’t exactly salubrious, but the people I knew around there weren’t bad, or lazy, or stupid. More often than not, they just lacked the opportunities that many take for granted. And when my school careers advisor said I should set my…
Bim Afolami on the changing nature of finance in the digital economy What did the financial crisis demonstrate about modern, big and globalised finance? Although we appreciate that the answer as to who ‘caused’ the financial crisis is complex, the crisis has shown that much recent financial innovation has failed to create (or even enhance) enough economic value in the real economy. In the future, the key question is: how should finance help serve the new economy and correspondingly re-legitimise…

Latest from Twitter